Thinking ourselves back in time – part 2 (Sounds)

Lots of us are currently stuck at home! Pick a nice day and take a little time to sit by an open window – what can you hear outside? Make a list or draw a picture of some of the things you can hear making a noise.

If we stepped back in time 100 or 1000 years, how many of the sounds you heard today would you have heard then? Choose two or three of the bullet points below and see if you can answer the questions – you might need to undertake a little research!

  • Did you hear any animals? Or perhaps bees buzzing loudly?! In the past the sound of birds and animals would have been common – perhaps a drover was passing nearby – what job does a drover do? What sounds would he have heard? Make a recording of your family pretending to be the animals, insects and birds!
  • Perhaps you heard other children playing in their gardens? Reciting rhymes can be part of play – ask an older family member or friend to teach you a new rhyme. Some rhymes are known to have been around for several hundred years, and this one tells of the noise that might have alerted the townsfolk to the arrival of people begging:

Hark, hark, the dogs do bark, the beggars are coming to town.
Some in rags and some in tags and some in a velvet gown.

  • Did you hear any music or the sound of a TV coming from your house or someone else’s? Radio and television are fairly recent inventions so people in the past would have entertained themselves with telling stories, singing and making their own music. Search YouTube for clips on ‘Tudor instruments’; some have really funny names! Which instrument do you like the sound of the most or the least?!
  • Could you hear anyone working? What were they doing? Blacksmiths have been a feature of settlements for thousands of years and the noises they made would have been very familiar. What equipment would a blacksmith need to carry out their work? Do you think you would like their job?! Our blacksmith’s forge at the Weald & Downland is from Southwater, the below photo was taken in about 1910.

Why not book a ticket now for when we re-open and visit us for your chance to experience the sights of the past.

Tickets booked during the Coronavirus lock-down will be valid for 24 months, single use only.