fbpx

School News

Thinking ourselves back in time – part 3 (Smells)

Still at home?! Pick a nice day and open one of your windows (or go out into your garden). What can you smell?! Hopefully your nose will pick up some nice scents – make a list or draw some pictures of the things you can smell.

Do you think you would have experienced the same smells if we could step back in time? Pick two or three of the bullet points below and see if you can answer the questions and complete the tasks – you might need to undertake a little research!

  • Hopefully you enjoyed some nice smells – were there any nasty ones?! Animal smells would have been common in the past and sadly, people could also have been quite smelly at times. Bathrooms in houses only became common in more recent times and the washing machine hadn’t been invented! Watch ‘How Clean were Medieval People’ on YouTube to find out a little more…
  • Did you take a sniff of any plants in your garden? Herbalists in Tudor times believed that many plants had special powers. You might have been lucky enough to smell violets which are believed to be capable of cooling a fever. If you are allowed to, gather a small posy of nice smelling flowers and plants and arrange in a small vase/ jug/ jam jar. Paint (or draw) a picture of your flower arrangement whilst enjoying the pleasant smells.

  • Plants are also grown because they are tasty to eat – did you find anything edible with a powerful smell?! Ask permission to check out some of the vegetables and fruits in your fridge/ fruit bowl – order them from least smelly to smelliest and ask someone else if they agree with the order you decided!
  • Cooking smells can carry easily from room to room and sometimes house to house if windows are open. The smoke from cooking fires would have added to the smell, particularly in an open Tudor kitchen like ‘Winkhurst’ at the Weald & Downland Living Museum. Sit in your kitchen whilst a meal is being cooked – what individual ingredients can you smell? Do you find them pleasant or unpleasant smells?
  • Perhaps you smelt somebody smoking outside? Tobacco was new to people in the Tudor era – where did it come from? How did it get here?

Why not book a ticket now for when we re-open and visit us for your chance to experience the sights of the past.

Tickets booked during the Coronavirus lock-down will be valid for 24 months, single use only.

Thinking ourselves back in time – part 2 (Sounds)

Lots of us are currently stuck at home! Pick a nice day and take a little time to sit by an open window – what can you hear outside? Make a list or draw a picture of some of the things you can hear making a noise.

If we stepped back in time 100 or 1000 years, how many of the sounds you heard today would you have heard then? Choose two or three of the bullet points below and see if you can answer the questions – you might need to undertake a little research!

  • Did you hear any animals? Or perhaps bees buzzing loudly?! In the past the sound of birds and animals would have been common – perhaps a drover was passing nearby – what job does a drover do? What sounds would he have heard? Make a recording of your family pretending to be the animals, insects and birds!
  • Perhaps you heard other children playing in their gardens? Reciting rhymes can be part of play – ask an older family member or friend to teach you a new rhyme. Some rhymes are known to have been around for several hundred years, and this one tells of the noise that might have alerted the townsfolk to the arrival of people begging:

Hark, hark, the dogs do bark, the beggars are coming to town.
Some in rags and some in tags and some in a velvet gown.

  • Did you hear any music or the sound of a TV coming from your house or someone else’s? Radio and television are fairly recent inventions so people in the past would have entertained themselves with telling stories, singing and making their own music. Search YouTube for clips on ‘Tudor instruments’; some have really funny names! Which instrument do you like the sound of the most or the least?!
  • Could you hear anyone working? What were they doing? Blacksmiths have been a feature of settlements for thousands of years and the noises they made would have been very familiar. What equipment would a blacksmith need to carry out their work? Do you think you would like their job?! Our blacksmith’s forge at the Weald & Downland is from Southwater, the below photo was taken in about 1910.

Why not book a ticket now for when we re-open and visit us for your chance to experience the sights of the past.

Tickets booked during the Coronavirus lock-down will be valid for 24 months, single use only.

Thinking ourselves back in time – part 1 (Sights)

With the rain feeding our gardens and the sun getting ready to reappear, many of us are currently stuck inside! Why not take a little time to sit by a window and notice what you can see outside? Make a list or draw a picture of what you can see.

Of all the things on your list or in your pictures, how many of them would have been there if we stepped back in time? See if you can answer the questions below? You might need to undertake a little research!

  • What building materials did you notice when you looked outside?
    In the distant past, people’s homes were built using local materials – what materials can you see in the photographs below, of houses at the Weald & Downland Living Museum? Where would those materials have come from? Make a pictorial map of your local area but make the houses look old fashioned – or maybe they already do?!

  • How many of the houses you can see from your window have chimneys?
    Modern houses are rarely built with a chimney – why is that? Only one of these houses (pictured above) has a chimney, so in the other one, it would have been pretty smoky when they lit the fire – the hearth is in the middle of the floor in the main room!
  • Can you see any trees from your window?
    Woodlands in the past were often privately owned – landowners could be the king or queen, wealthy landowners, or even the church. Most people did not have a right to the resources from them…
    If you had a woodland, what would you be able to get from it that could be useful? See if you can think of ten things!

Search for ‘Dog at Weald and Downland’ on YouTube if you want to see a dog’s-eye view of the museum!

Why not book a ticket now for when we re-open and visit us for your chance to experience the sights of the past.

Tickets booked during the Coronavirus lock-down will be valid for 24 months, single use only.

Easter Activities For All To Enjoy!

We have a number of egg-citing activities and competitions to keep you creatively active over the two-week Easter holiday break whilst at home.

Why not create a piece of art by using your recycling waste aka ‘junk modelling’? How about some mindfulness colouring time? Or perhaps test your knowledge of the Museum?

The only prerequisite is… TO HAVE FUN!


Please share this page with your friends, family and social communities to spread the joy, don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter 


Easter themed decorations & activities:


Museum challenges:


Mindful Museum Colouring:


Competitions:

1. Junk Modelling

This Easter use your imagination to get creative with your recycling for the Weald & Downland Living Museum Junk Modelling competition!

Two age categories:

1. 16 years and under

2. 17 years and above

The winner of each group will receive a small prize! 

Brief:

It’s simple – make an object or scene which best represents the Weald & Downland Living Museum! Could it be a medieval house, historic garden, working farm animal, library? The possibilities are endless!

How to enter:

There are three ways to enter:

  1. Upload photos of your finished pieces to your Facebook page and tag us @wealddownmuseum and caption your piece of work, including the age of the artist
  2. Upload photos of your finished pieces to your instagram account, tag us @wealddownmuseum and use #WDLMcompetition and caption your piece of work, including the age of the artist
  3. Email your photos to [email protected], include your title of work, name and age.
    By emailing your entry, you give the Weald & Downland Living Museum permission to upload the photo/s, first name and age of the entrant across the Museum’s social media channels.

2. Colouring competition for 6 & under:

Please download and print the attached colouring sheet of our lovely Poplar Cottage – The winner will receive a small prize!

To enter:

  • Take a photo of the finished piece
  • Share on social media tagging us @wealddownmuseum and use #WDLMcolour
  • Add first name and age of artist
  • Alternatively, email your entry to [email protected] – include the first name and age of the artist.
    By emailing your entry you give the Weald & Downland Living Museum permission to upload the photo/s, first name and age of the entrant across the Museum’s social media channels.

Submit your competition entries by 5pm (BST) Sunday, 19 April

Winners wills be announced from Monday, 20 April

Good luck, stay safe & have a Happy Easter!

Historical fiction short story competition for under 18s

Are you imaginative and creative and do you like writing? Why not take part in our historical fiction short story competition?

The judges will be looking for an engaging historical story. The buildings and artefacts of the Weald & Downland Living Museum reflect rural life between the years 900AD and 1930AD and entries should relate to this theme and be set somewhere in this time period. Expect to do a little historical research! You may enter in one of the following categories:

  1. An illustrated story (picture book) of up to 100 words [Aimed predominantly at children Y2 or below]
  2. A story of between 400 and 600 words, which you may or may not choose to illustrate.

Entries must be original stories written by the entrant (though a little help with spelling considered acceptable!). Please find the entry form below, with full terms and conditions.

The deadline is 5pm on Friday, 4 September 2020 and there will be a few small prizes awarded! Winners will be announced in early 2021.

GOOD LUCK!

Entry-form-for-historical-fiction-under 18 2020 (Word doc)

Entry-form-for-historical-fiction-under 18 2020 (PDF)

Free visit for teachers: Saturday 7 March 2020

On Saturday 7 March 2020, you are invited to our Spring Teacher Preview Day to find out more about the Museum, what we offer for school groups and opportunities for learning outside the classroom. Enjoy free entry to our 40-acre site for you and up to two guests, as well as a welcome pack including free resources and refreshments on arrival.

The day provides an opportunity for you to talk to our specialist schools team about the large variety of workshops we offer. Team members will be on hand to discuss your specific requirements and how we can arrange a bespoke visit to suit your needs, including cross-curricular links where desired.

Explore the whole Museum site, including some taster sessions demonstrating our workshops.

To book your place please email [email protected] and give your name, school name and those of your two guests.

Schools exhibition – October 2020

During a couple of weeks in October 2020 we are inviting school groups to put up an exhibition inspired by the Weald & Downland Living Museum and steward it in the newly opened Michael Burton Gallery at the Museum.

We are offering a maximum of 2 days per schools exhibition and the dates available are:

Monday 12 – Tuesday 13 October
Wednesday 14 – Thursday 15 October
Friday 16 October
Monday 19 October
Tuesday 20 – Wednesday 21 October
Thursday 22 – Friday 23 October

Please send an email with your idea to [email protected] to reserve a date for your school group. We will let you know the layout and set up arrangements.
No costs apply. This activity is part of the Museum’s celebration of its 50th birthday in 2020.

Winter Workshops 2019/20

Bookings are now being taken for our 2019/20 Winter Workshops.

If you plan to visit us during December 2019 through to February 2020, why not take part in one of our special whole day programmes, which can be tailored to suit the time period you are studying.

We offer sessions with a Saxon, Tudor or Victorian focus or we can provide a bespoke day that meets your class’s needs.

Cost: £9.50 per pupil, including entry and a full day of workshops.

Maximum 60 children per day.

For more details please contact us on 01243 811459 or email [email protected]

JOIN OUR HISTORY GANG!

JOIN OUR HISTORY GANG!

An exciting, creative group for 8-12 year olds at the Weald & Downland Living Museum

We meet for a half-day on a Saturday once a month.

Don’t miss out – sign up and join us today!

When?
A half-day Saturday once a month (see details below).

Where?
Within the historic houses of our Museum.

Who is it for?
It’s for 8 to 12 year-olds. The group will be friendly, informal and fun, with a small team of Museum leaders who will be there every session too. We’ll expect everyone to get along and help each other – there will be lots to do each time!

What will they do?
Lots of different indoor and outdoor activities! Craft activities, helping with a rural life weekend, the ‘worst jobs’ in history, calligraphy, natural navigation/survival skills, foal watch, music, Olympics/games day, library team day, and much more…

There is also an optional overnight camp each August.

HOW CAN MY CHILD JOIN?

Your child can join the History Gang at any time during the year and sessions for 2019 will run on the following dates:

  • February 16th
  • March 16th
  • April 13th
  • May 18th
  • June 15th
  • July 27th
  • September 21st
  • October 19th
  • November 16th

Please see these two documents for details:

If you have any difficulty accessing these documents or have a question, please contact Sally on 01243 811459 or [email protected].