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Welcome to the Weald & Downland Living Museum

Come and discover rescued rural buildings set in a beautiful landscape, which tell the stories of the people who lived and worked in them over 1,000 years.

Enjoy our 40-acre site and visit our collection of historic buildings – we have more than 50 to explore from a replica Anglo-Saxon hall house to an Edwardian tin tabernacle church. There is a regular programme of demonstrations, including milling in our 17th century watermill; cooking in our Tudor kitchen; blacksmithing in our Victorian smithy; plus seasonal demonstrations. Take a walk in the woods, bring the dog (we are dog friendly), visit our waterside café or enjoy your own picnic. We currently have three new exhibit buildings under construction: a dairy and bakehouse, near the watermill, plus a late 18th century barn and early 19th century stable known as May Day Farm.

Updates:

  • Café closure: our café will be closed Saturday 13 – Thursday 18 January and Monday 22 – Friday 26 January. We will be offering a limited service (excluding the Wassailing Feast) from Friday 19 – Sunday 21 January. We apologise for any inconvenience.
  • Although our watermill is open, milling activities are dependent on the water level of our mill pond.
  • Our stunning new waterside café, Wattle & Daub and gift shop are both open to the public and are dog friendly.

Interested in historic trades and crafts? We also run a broad range of adult education courses in traditional rural trades and crafts and in historic building conservation, plus two MSc programmes.

Customer reviews:

“Very interesting place to visit. Volunteers bring this place to life & are very informative. Great for children and adults”
November 2017

“This was an absolutely charming museum with a beautiful collection of carefully preserved historic buildings and gardens.”
November 2017

“One of the most comprehensive open air museums for its content of reclaimed buildings from around the southeast of England. Wandering around, you really get a feel for the lifestyle of the inhabitants and feel like you can transport yourself back in time.”
November 2017

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